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October 23,1911 – A spot of English T
This Day

October 23,1911 – A spot of English T

The Ford Motor Company began intercontinental production on this day in 1911 when the first Model Ts left a factory in Trafford Park, Manchester, England, the first Ford assembly plant outside of North America. Three years after production started here, Britain’s first moving assembly line was installed at the plant, allowing the factory to pump out more than 20 vehicles per hour. Exterior of Trafford Park plant An expansion of the plant after World War I significantly increased production. By the beginning of the 1920s 41 percent of all registered cars in Britain were Fords. To further improve production numbers a plant with better access to a deep water port was ordered by Henry Ford. This new manufacturing building was completed on the River Thames in Dagenham in 1923. Ford stil...
Dusty & Rusty – 1968 Ford Mustang J Code
Dusty & Rusty

Dusty & Rusty – 1968 Ford Mustang J Code

If you caught the earlier post about today being the anniversary of the release of Bullitt, then you'll have extra appreciation for this 1968 Ford Mustang fastback that could be the base of your Bullitt tribute car. Midway through 1968 Ford replaced the 289 with a 302, which resulted in the J code in the VIN, a one year listing. The only real difference in the motor was the intake and heads, which were the same ones used on the '66 289, but with updated castings. So while the J code may be rare, it's hardly more than a 289 in an ironed shirt. That's essentially the long winded way of saying, YOU WANT $20,000 FOR THIS? The 1968 Mustang in question after it was pulled from the weeds -- where it looked way cooler This is a serious case of "I know what I have!" While the seller seems to...
October 1, 1908 – The first Model T leaves the assembly line
Automotive, This Day

October 1, 1908 – The first Model T leaves the assembly line

An automobile revolution began on this day in 1908 when the first Ford Model T left Ford's Piquette Plant in Detroit, Michigan. Model T assembly line in 1913 The Ford Model T was an instant success. It’s affordability and rugged dependability resulted in a car fit for the masses. Between 1908 and 1927 Ford built more than 15 million Model T in one form or another. It was the longest production run of any car until the Volkswagen Beetle beat the record in 1972. Model T factory in Buenos Aires, Argentina The Ford Model T became a global vehicles within years of starting production. Aside from being produced in numerous locations around the US, Model Ts were assembled in countries including Canada, England, Germany, Argentina, France, Spain, Denmark, Norway, Belgium, Brazil, M...
December 31, 1927 – The last Dearborn Independent
Business

December 31, 1927 – The last Dearborn Independent

“The Dearborn Independent,” also referred to as “The Ford International Weekly,” was a weekly paper established in 1901 in Dearborn, Michigan, purchased by in 1919, and last went to press on this day in 1927. After being acquired by Ford from previous owner Marcus Woodruff, Henry Ford used the paper to pass along his views, which were largely anti-Semitic. Ford is well known for ranting about Jewish people, blaming them for the world’s wars. Although the paper reached a circulation of nearly 900,000 by 1925, it was shut down due to numerous lawsuits surrounding the anti-Semitic materials. In 1938, on Ford’s 75th birthday, German consul presented Ford with a Grand Cross of the German Eagle medal, the highest honor the German government could present to a foreigner.  A copy of the Dearborn I...
November, 19 1959 – End of Edsel
Business

November, 19 1959 – End of Edsel

On this day in 1959 Ford announced it would be ending its Edsel program. The cars, named after Henry Ford’s son, were to be a premium/intermediate level car between that fell just below Lincoln. The idea for a new car brand was introduced as early as 1955 and after much research and development the much anticipated Edsel was introduced to the general public on September 4, 1957. The public and press were less than flattered. Having been promised a brand new car, apart from everything else on the market, the Edsel fell far short, as it shared bodywork and mechanical components with other Fords. When production ended at the end of November 1959, only 2,846 vehicles were produced for 1960, Edsel’s last model year, before the brand was discontinued. Altogether 118,287 Edsels were built over th...

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