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March 12, 1831 – Clement Studebaker is born
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March 12, 1831 – Clement Studebaker is born

Clement Studebaker, born on this day in 1831, and his older brother Henry founded H&C Studebaker Company in 1852 in South Bend, Indiana to build wagons and provide blacksmithing services. By age 14 Clement had become a skilled blacksmith after apprenticing under his father. Henry sold his interest in the company to their younger brother John in 1858 when the business was busy building wagons for the U.S. Army. This was likely a conflict of interest for Henry, who was a Dunkard, a committed pacifist.  Above: Portrait of Studebaker brothers. Left to right, (standing) Jacob; (seated) Peter, Clement, Henry, and John.Top: 1963 Studebaker Avanti. By Kevauto - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0 Thomas Edison in his 1903 electric Studebaker The younger two brothers were joined by two mo...
November 1, 1955 – Studebaker Hawk line is introduced
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November 1, 1955 – Studebaker Hawk line is introduced

Studebaker introduced the Hawk on this day in 1955 for the 1956 model year. Described as a "family sports car," the line included the Golden Hawk, Sky Hawk, Power Hawk, and Flight Hawk, the lowest priced model. The Hawk cars, which succeeded the Studebaker Speedster, were all two door, four seat hardtops. In 1957 the line up consisted of only the Golden Hawk and the new Silver Hawk. The following year Packard released a one year only Hawk of its own. Above: 1956 Studebaker Hawk. By KarleHorn at German Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0. Top: 1961 Studebaker Hawk. By Liz West CC BY 2.0, In the late 1950s, Studebaker, along with many automakers, suffered from declining sales. This hardship resulted in the drop of the Golden Hawk for 1959, leaving only the Silver Hawk. In 1960 the name was r...
March 18, 1933 – Studebaker goes bankrupt
This Day

March 18, 1933 – Studebaker goes bankrupt

In 1920, under the presidency of Albert Erskine, Studebaker finally fully committed to the auto industry after building its last horse drawn wagon. Though it had been building cars for about two decades, the company had a 60 year history of wagon building. Throughout the 1920s Erskine led Studebaker through the acquisition of luxury automaker Pierce-Arrow and the launch of two short lived, more affordable automobile lines, Erskine and Rockne. Following the stock market crash of October 1929, Studebaker fell into a tailspin. The money troubles mounted, leading Studebaker to the company going into receivership on this day in 1933. The financial crisis resulted in Erskine being ousted from his role as president. Riddled with personal debt and numerous health problems, the newly unemp...

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