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Father’s Day Gifts for your Gearhead Dad
Features

Father’s Day Gifts for your Gearhead Dad

Does your dad love classic cars? Is he into old trucks and muscle cars? Could your dad's closet use a tune up? What about a new mug for his morning coffee in the garage? This Day in Automotive History has a host of gifts for your car crazy pops. Check out these great Father's Day gifts below! Best Trucking Dad Ever - Father's Day truck gifts Is you dad into trucks? Perhaps he is the best trucking dad ever then! If so, this is the Dad's day gifts you need. Check out the sweet Father's day shirt and sweatshirt, but don't miss the stainless tumbler or for the every stylish Pops, get the hat. Check out this line up here: https://bit.ly/3wU4E8q. Old or classic Father's Day shirt - muscle car ...
I found a Tucker 48 on Google Street View
Features

I found a Tucker 48 on Google Street View

Screenshot (Google) If you're unfamiliar with the Tucker story, start here. If you're aware, you probably know that just fifty complete Tuckers left the Chicago assembly plant, plus the original prototype, before operations seized on March 3, 1949. Incredibly, 49 of those 51 cars have survived to date. Of the two that didn't make it, one is accounted for, burned and buried in someone's yard. The only unaccounted Tucker, #1042, supposedly ended up in poor condition along a Tennessee river, only to have a cop tow it to his house. Soon after, the cop got into a motorcycle wreck and ended up in the hospital for quite some time. During his stay, his landlord apparently towed the car off, perhaps to the crusher, but there is no official record. So to this day, #1042 is the only missing Tucke...
This House For Sale has a 1916 Ford Model T in the Basement
Features

This House For Sale has a 1916 Ford Model T in the Basement

via RedFin Is anyone else addicted to real estate websites and looking at property that you'll never buy? No? Oh. Well, I am and it seems my habit has led me to an interesting discovery, although I am sure there is more to the tale. This incredibly unique home in Des Plaines. Illinois surely was someone's pride and joy for many years. It's a mid-century masterpiece still adorned by all the pastel and wood veneer finishes you could ever want. Heck, there's even a tree growing inside it, assuming that tree is real. But if the funky color schemes and grand chandeliers aren't doing it for you, perhaps the 1916 Ford Model T parked in the basement will. This is a 1916 Ford Model T parked somewhere in this house for sale. via RedFin Truth be told, the listing doesn't say if the Ford Mod...
Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Here’s 17 Cool Green Cars & Trucks
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Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Here’s 17 Cool Green Cars & Trucks

What better what to celebrate St. Patrick's Day than with a gallery of green cars? Well, perhaps a Guinness and some Irish beef stew. Either way, enjoy these rides and get out their and chase a rainbow. We could all use a pot o' gold it seems. Happy St. Patrick's Day from This Day in Automotive History. Classic Ford Mustang VW Beetle Carabo concept car Dodge Viper Alfa Romeo Mercedes-Benz Ford Truck Porsche Mercedes AMG GT Roadster Nissan GT-R Lamborghini Muira Austin-Healey Chevy Corvette Willys Classic Pontiac Datsun pickup There's all sorts of cool rides in there, from a Lamborghini Muira and a Nissan GT-R to a Dodge Viper and a classic VW Bug. Head back to the This Day in Automotive History Facebook page and tell us which green...
Cars & Bars Episode 1: 1955 Ford Thunderbird
Cars & Bars, Features, Videos

Cars & Bars Episode 1: 1955 Ford Thunderbird

Welcome to the first episode of Cars & Bars from This Day in Automotive History, a hopefully ongoing series where you come for the cars and stay for the musical bars! First up, cruise with Marley and I in a 1955 Ford Thunderbird. We talk history, go bird watching, Marley sings a tune and we check out the rad little town of Edison, Washington. https://youtu.be/fA5FLvHRalU Love it? Donate here or send Venmo to @automotivehistory! Thanks for being a fan of This Day in Automotive History where we talk about the history of cars every single day! Like the sweater I wear in the video? Click the picture below and get one for yourself! Drive History Every Day! Get it here!
February 1, 1901 – Langston Hughes, American poet & road trip pioneer, is born
Features, This Day

February 1, 1901 – Langston Hughes, American poet & road trip pioneer, is born

Poet Langston Hughes in Harlem. (Photo by Robert W. Kelley/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images/Poetry Foundation) Born in Missouri on this day in 1901, Langston Hughes would grow up to be a prominent poet, novelist, activist and an important social figure of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. What he wasn’t known for, was his driving skills, which were apparently non-existent. Despite this, writer and cultural archivist Zora Neale Hurston had no qualms inviting Hughes to join her on an epic road trip of great importance in 1927. Hughes had just jumped off the train in Mobile, Alabama after a stint in New Orleans when he had a chance encounter with Hurston. Though he had recently finished a speaking engagement, his pockets were more or less empty but his spirit remained fu...
January 22, 1990 – Cord & Duesenberg designer Gordon Buehrig dies
Features, This Day

January 22, 1990 – Cord & Duesenberg designer Gordon Buehrig dies

Legend has it that Gordon Buehrig was expelled from his design college for drawing cars on textbooks. While the punishment may not fit the crime, if true, he didn't let it affect his day dreams. Those sketches soon, quite soon really, became reality. Instead of trying to finish college, he left his Illinois home headed for the Motor City. After arriving in Detroit he found work at Packard and then General Motors. For young Buehrig, born in 1904, designing the Le Mans competing 1929 Black Hawk couldn't be a better job. That is, until his artistic approach to car design caught the eye of E.L. Cord, who had purchased Duesenberg just three years earlier. Courted by Cord, Gordon Buehrig found himself as Duesenberg's chief designer at the tender age of 25. Among his first tasks: design...
January 2, 1974 – E.L. Cord, transportation empire owner, dies
Features, This Day

January 2, 1974 – E.L. Cord, transportation empire owner, dies

E.L. Cord with an Auburn automobile. Courtesy of Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum. Errett Lobban Cord, better known as E. L., began his automotive career as a race car driver, mechanic and car salesman. He would go on to create an automotive empire that including ownership of some of the most luxurious American car brands in the 1920s and 1930s, Auburn and Duesenberg. During that time he also founded Cord, a vehicle among the most mechanically unique to come out of the era. Throughout this life he'd also hold roles as entertainment executive and state law maker. His career and life came to an end when he died from cancer on this day in 1974 at age 79. E.L. Cord with a Cord 810 E.L. Cord buys Auburn Automobile Company Born in Missouri in 1894, Cord became a jack of all trades ty...
December 25, 1878 – Louis Chevrolet is born
Features, This Day

December 25, 1878 – Louis Chevrolet is born

Louis Chevrolet at right. Louis Chevrolet, namesake to Chevrolet Motor Car Company, was born on this day in 1878 in Switzerland. After immigrating to Paris as a child he became fascinated with bicycle racing and mechanics. He spent his early adulthood working in various mechanics shops before moving to Canada and then New York by 1900. There he found work at the Brooklyn operations of the French car manufacturer de Dion-Bouton, giving him a chance to hone his automobile engineering skills. He would soon discover a passion for driving. Above: Louis Chevrolet: Top: Chevrolet driving a Frontenac The growing sport of automobile racing captured the world's awe, and Chevrolet was no exception. First hired in 1905 by FIAT, two years later he became a driver for Philadelphia based Autoca...
December 15, 1969 – The last Plymouth Superbird
Features, This Day

December 15, 1969 – The last Plymouth Superbird

The story of the Plymouth Superbird and its development is fairly well-known, so we won't get into heavy details. In brief, it had one job, to dominate NASCAR along with its older sibling, the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona. While Dodge only had to build 500 Daytonas to be eligible for the 1969 NASCAR season, the sanctioning body changed the rules for 1970 to combat purpose built race cars. For Plymouth, that meant at least 1,920 Superbirds needed to end up on dealer lots to qualify for the track. With a target set, the assembly line churned. Before long workers hit their mark and the last Plymouth Superbird rolled off the assembly line on this day in 1969. Check out the green car below. An ad for a 1970 Plymouth Superbird When all's said and done, somewhere between 1,969 and 1,982 ...

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