April 14, 1912 – A Renault sinks aboard the Titanic

Scene from the movie Titanic, not the actual car (duh)

There are probably very few, if any, remnants left of a certain 1912 Renault Type CB Coupe de Ville at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. Yes, that Renault, made famous by Jack and Rose in “Titanic.” The ship struck an iceberg during her maiden voyage on this day in 1912, sending it, 1,503 souls and that Renault to the ocean floor.

The RMS Titanic

William Carter had purchased the Renault in Europe and loaded it aboard the ocean liner, destined for New York City. He and his family joined the car on the ship, hoping for a nice cruise between continents. Obviously, that didn’t happen, but unlike the Renault, Carter and his family made it back to shore. The vehicle has never been located, despite many excursions seeking Titanic artifacts.

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