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Tag: 1949

November 25, 1949 – The 1,000,000th Cadillac
This Day

November 25, 1949 – The 1,000,000th Cadillac

On this day in 1949, a 1949 Cadillac Coupe de Ville rolled off the assembly line, marking the 1,000,000th Cadillac to be manufactured since the company's inception in 1902. Pictured with the vehicle above are John F. Gordon, General Manager; Don E. Ahrens, General Sales Manager; and C.A. Raftrey, Works Manager. Standard specs for the 1949 Cadillac Coupe deVille included a 331 V8 that made 160 horsepower. It could power the approximately 4,250 pound car to nearly 100 mph. It averaged 13.5 miles per gallon when equipped with 4 speed Hydra-Matic transmission. 1958 Cadillac Sedan de Ville, same model as the two millionth Cadillac While it took Cadillac nearly 50 years to reach the one million mark, it'd only be 9 more before the two millionth Caddy hit the streets. It was Februa...
Dusty & Rusty – 1949 Chevrolet 3100
Dusty & Rusty

Dusty & Rusty – 1949 Chevrolet 3100

As the world healed from World War II, American automotive factories refocused production from military to civilian for the first time since early 1942. While many automakers wouldn't offer a brand new design for the sedans and coupes until 1949, four years after the war ended, Chevrolet was an early player in postwar styling, at least for their trucks. Midway through 1947 Chevrolet debuted the Advanced Design series, available as the 1/2 ton 3100, 3/4 ton 3600 and 1 ton 3800, as well as the heavier-duty Loadmasters. Advertised as larger and more powerful than its predecessors, the series would lead truck sales among US brands from its debut in 1947 until it was replaced in 1955 with little restyling. This Advanced Design 1949 Chevrolet 3100 is offered on Craigslist out of Chesapeake, VA,...
September 28, 1949 – A small car with a big name comes to market
Automotive, This Day

September 28, 1949 – A small car with a big name comes to market

British company Jowett Cars debuted their first and only sports car, the Jupiter, on this day in 1949 at the London Motor Show. The Jupiter was designed in just four months by Austrian engineer Dr. Robert Eberan von Eberhorst and Jowett’s own body stylist Reg Korner. Only about 900 Jupiters had been produced when production ended in 1954, which was enough to achieve great success in auto racing. The flat four, 1486 cc powered Jupiters would take a class wins at the 1950 Le Mans 24 Hour race and the 1951 Monte Carlo International Rally, an overall win in the 1951 Lisbon International Rally, and a class one-two win in the public road race at Dundrod in Northern Ireland in September 1951, just to name a few victories. Cover image: A Jowett Jupiter, circa 1952. Photographed in Congleto...
December 16, 1949 – The first production Saab
Business

December 16, 1949 – The first production Saab

Saab’s first production vehicle, the 92, first rolled out of the Trollhättan Assembly factory on this day in 1949. Saab, originally an airplane manufacturer, began an automotive branch in 1945. They created four prototype vehicles, called the Ursaab, or “original Saab,” which led to the production model. The 92 was extremely aerodynamic with a body stamped from a single piece of sheet metal, of which was then cut to accommodate doors and windows. The original Saabs featured a 764 cc two stroke water cooled engine that produced 25 horsepower. Because Saab had a surplus of green paint from wartime airplane production, all early Saab 92s were this color, which is close to British racing green. More than 20,000 92s were sold before the introduction of the Saab 93 in 1955. Pics:1950 Saab 92 by ...
November 13, 1940 – Willys delivers its Jeep prototype
Business

November 13, 1940 – Willys delivers its Jeep prototype

Approximately two months before this day in 1940 American Bantam Car Company delivered a prototype of what would come to be known as the Jeep to the US Army. Impressed, but not sold, the Army claimed ownership of the design and passed the blueprints on to Willys-Overland, with a few requests for changes. The resulting prototype was delivered by Willys on this day in 1940, thus beating out Bantam for the government contract to produce the vehicles. Eventually Ford was also selected to produce Jeeps for the war effort and Bantam was to produce Jeep trailers. The original Jeep designed by Bantam was created by Karl Probst. There were 2,765 of these Jeeps made, nearly half of which went to the British Army. The Army ultimately selected Willys and Ford to produce the Jeeps because they had the ...

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