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January 14, 1954 – Nash & Hudson merge to form AMC
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January 14, 1954 – Nash & Hudson merge to form AMC

In what was the largest corporate merger US history at the time, Nash-Kelvinator Corporation agreed to merge with Hudson Motor Car Company to form American Motors Corporation (AMC) on this day in 1954. The deal was led by Nash-Kelvinator CEO George Mason who hoped to build a strong competitor of the Big Three: General Motors, Ford and Chrysler. Above: This 1960 Rambler American Wagon offered space and great fuel economy. By Greg Gjerdingen. Top: The Metropolitan, first built by Nash for 1954, remained a key part of the AMC lineup through 1961 as they continued to push smaller cars. Pictured is a 1956 Hudson. Within a year, Mason died of health complications. His assistant, George Romney, took over the role of CEO. Under Romney’s direction, Nash focused on its Rambler line o...
December 3, 1979 – The last AMC Pacer
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December 3, 1979 – The last AMC Pacer

The 1970s gas crisis forced automakers to rethink their rather bulbous lineups. By the middle of the decade, consumers interest in style and power waned as focused shifted to value and fuel efficiency. AMC's answer? The Pacer. When it debuted in February 1975, AMC appeared to have an instant hit on its hands. More than 145,000 Pacers sold in their first year of production alone. Like the 70s, sales soon ran out of gas. Between 1976 and the end of 1979, the car averaged sales of about 35,000 units per year. That's good, if you're selling pet rocks. By the time Pacer production ended on this day in 1979, some 280,000 had left the assembly line in total. 1975 AMC Pacer interior and dash. By Christopher Ziemnowicz. Top: The large amount of glass used in the Pacer gave it the name ...
August 22, 1967 – AMC throws a Javelin into the Pony Car market
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August 22, 1967 – AMC throws a Javelin into the Pony Car market

On this day in 1967, AMC issued a press release, pictured above, officially announcing the 1968 AMC Javelin. The vehicle would help AMC shed its commuter car appearance and as it jumped into the pony car market dominated by the Ford Mustang and Chevrolet Camaro. When the Dick Teague designed Javelin hit showrooms about a month later, on September 26, the base model retailed for $2,743, about $21,500 today. If you opted for the base hardtop Mustang you would pay $2,567 or you get a Camaro for $2,450. 1968 AMC Javelin Interior For 1968 and 1969 a Javelin buyer had five engine options, ranging from the standard 232 inline 6 up to the 390 V8 that produced 315 horsepower. The latter became available midway through the 1968 model year. When the car was first released the biggest engi...
Dusty & Rusty – Herd of Metropolitans for sale – $500 to $3,000 each
Cheap Classic Cars, Classifieds, Dusty & Rusty

Dusty & Rusty – Herd of Metropolitans for sale – $500 to $3,000 each

The Metropolitan is an interesting little car, and with a wheel base shorter than a VW, little it is. Though badged as an American Nash, Hudson, and even as its own sub-brand of AMC, the Metropolitan has a strong English accent. After initial design work and protyping was completed in Kenosha, WI, Nash executives realized it'd be too expensive to build from scratch. They contracted with England's Austin to build the car, using European underpinnings that'd help bring the cost down further. For the first time, a North American designed car, meant for the North American market, had assembly completed outside of the US. The goal to save money worked, and the vehicle destined to be American's "second car" began rolling out of English factories in October 1953. It seems this seller had ...
February 28, 1975 – AMC Introduces the Pacer
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February 28, 1975 – AMC Introduces the Pacer

The “first wide small car,” the AMC Pacer, hit showrooms on this day in 1975. Quickly earning the nickname the Flying Fishbowl, the Pacer and its 37% glass surface area was AMC’s sub compact snub to the gas guzzlers that were continuously rolling out of American auto plants. Despite worries from inside AMC about its design, the economical car received various accolades from Car and Driver and Road and Track. Popular Mechanics even wrote, “This is the first time in the history of the American automobile industry that a car manufacturer has said in advance of bringing out a new product that some people may not like it.” Above: D/L Coupe - By Triskel99 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0Top: 1975 AMC Pacer D/L by Greg Gherdingen Richard Teague, American Motor’s chief stylist, began work on the ca...
February 15, 1968 – The AMC AMX debuts
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February 15, 1968 – The AMC AMX debuts

American Motors Corporation officially debuted the AMX at Daytona International Speedway on this day in 1968. Journalists watched in awe as the new two seat muscle car ripped around the track at more than 130 mph. Though the car appeared as a stripped down Javelin, one of the writers, Tom McCahill, later called the AMC AMX "the hottest thing to ever come out of Wisconsin." With the only other American two seater being the Corvette that year, the AMX offered buyers a unique alternative in a crowded high horsepower market. At a grand less than the Vette, it appealed to both sports car and muscle car enthusiasts. In 1969, the top of the line 340 hp, 390 ci V8 could power the car down straightaways with ease, yet the vehicle's nimble configuration made it a star on road courses as well. ...

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