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October 29, 1954 – The last true Hudson leaves the factory
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October 29, 1954 – The last true Hudson leaves the factory

1954 Hudson Jet The last true Hudson left the assembly line on this day in 1954 following the May 1, 1954 merger with Nash to form American Motors. The name Hudson would live on for three more production years as rebadged Nashes, the last of those leaving the factory on June 25, 1957. The first Hudson car factory. Mack and Beaufait Avenues, Detroit, 1909, The founding of Hudson occurred on February 20, 1909 by eight Detroit businessmen. They received financing for the company from Joseph L. Hudson, a department store entrepreneur, which led to the name. Hudson set a record for most cars sold in an automaker’s first full year of production at 4,508, putting it in 17th place in the industry for sales at the time. A high placement considering the huge number of automakers in busines...
The Family Racer – 1953 Hudson Hornet
Cheap Classic Cars

The Family Racer – 1953 Hudson Hornet

In October of 1951 Hudson introduced an all new car that would become an instant hit on the young NASCAR circuit. The Hudson Hornet, powered by a beastly inline six, would dominate the track and many credit its success with the birth of the saying, "Win on Sunday, sell on Monday." Well, it may be Friday when this post goes up, but this 1953 Hudson Hornet for sale is still selling. This four-door model presents well in its original form, but is ready for restoration (and then racing!). Although it's not currently running, what's impressive about this family race car is its price. This Craigslist classic car is currently listed for just $4,500 just northwest of Milwaukee. Find the link below. Is it worth it? Yeah. Oh, yeah. 1953 Hudson Hornet Exterior First impression: stance! Tha...
October 16, 1950 – The Hudson Hornet debuts
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October 16, 1950 – The Hudson Hornet debuts

1951 Hudson Hornet convertible. By Herranderssvensson - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0 The old adage "Win on Sunday, sell on Monday" is linked to the early days of NASCAR when American automakers found success on the racetrack equated to sales on the showroom. Among the first large car companies to build a car almost specifically to dominate NASCAR was Hudson. It's entry to the field was the 1951 Hudson Hornet, which debuted on this day in 1950. The cars soon dominated the league, all starting with a win in its first entry, the 1951 season opener at Daytona. Marshall Teague drove his Fabulous Hudson Hornet to victory over 54 other cars. The Hornet soon began capturing checkered flags and championships over and over again. Several engineering feats helped the Hornet conquer the track. Among...
January 14, 1954 – Nash & Hudson merge to form AMC
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January 14, 1954 – Nash & Hudson merge to form AMC

In what was the largest corporate merger US history at the time, Nash-Kelvinator Corporation agreed to merge with Hudson Motor Car Company to form American Motors Corporation (AMC) on this day in 1954. The deal was led by Nash-Kelvinator CEO George Mason who hoped to build a strong competitor of the Big Three: General Motors, Ford and Chrysler. Above: This 1960 Rambler American Wagon offered space and great fuel economy. By Greg Gjerdingen. Top: The Metropolitan, first built by Nash for 1954, remained a key part of the AMC lineup through 1961 as they continued to push smaller cars. Pictured is a 1956 Hudson. Within a year, Mason died of health complications. His assistant, George Romney, took over the role of CEO. Under Romney’s direction, Nash focused on its Rambler line o...
July 22, 1934 – Car loving crook John Dillinger shot dead in Chicago
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July 22, 1934 – Car loving crook John Dillinger shot dead in Chicago

Public enemy number 1, John Dillinger, was shot and killed outside the Biograph Theather on this day in 1934. After an eight year stint behind bars, Dillinger spent the his last year on earth robbing banks, holding up restaurants and stealing fast cars. Dillinger often spoke of his love for fine automobiles, and when he wasn't stealing them, he had no problem laying down the cash for a top notch set of wheels. Dillinger, often given some sort of false Robin Hood label, was a star in the eye of the public despite his murderous crime spree. With so many infatuated with the fugitive, car companies were quick to capitalize on news of Dillinger's preference in certain automobiles. Above: The 1933 Essex Terraplane 8 purchased by John Dillinger in 1934 on display at the ACD museum. Photo ...
April 25, 1959 – Mario Andretti makes US racing debut
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April 25, 1959 – Mario Andretti makes US racing debut

Mario Andretti, made his US racing debut on this day in 1959, just four years after emigrating to the USA. The superstar driver started his racing career in Italy several years prior. It all began in 1953, at age 13, when he joined Italy’s Formula Junior racing league. Mario and his twin brother Aldo were born in Rina, in Montona, Istria, formerly the Kingdom of Italy, now Croatia. After the move to the US, Mario and Aldo took jobs at their uncle’s auto garage in Pennsylvania. There they earned money to purchase and modify a 1948 Hudson Commodore. Above: Andretti in the winners circle of the 1978 Dutch Grand Prix. By Suyk, Koen CC BY-SATop: The Andretti twins' 1948 Hudson On this day in 1959 the brothers entered the car into a dirt track race near Nazareth, Pennsylvania, making...
Dusty & Rusty – Herd of Metropolitans for sale – $500 to $3,000 each
Cheap Classic Cars, Classifieds, Dusty & Rusty

Dusty & Rusty – Herd of Metropolitans for sale – $500 to $3,000 each

The Metropolitan is an interesting little car, and with a wheel base shorter than a VW, little it is. Though badged as an American Nash, Hudson, and even as its own sub-brand of AMC, the Metropolitan has a strong English accent. After initial design work and protyping was completed in Kenosha, WI, Nash executives realized it'd be too expensive to build from scratch. They contracted with England's Austin to build the car, using European underpinnings that'd help bring the cost down further. For the first time, a North American designed car, meant for the North American market, had assembly completed outside of the US. The goal to save money worked, and the vehicle destined to be American's "second car" began rolling out of English factories in October 1953. It seems this seller had ...
February 20, 1909 – Hudson is founded
Automotive, This Day

February 20, 1909 – Hudson is founded

When eight businessmen from Detroit approached department store founder Joseph L. Hudson requesting an investment for a new automobile company he was likely a bit confused. He dealt in suits, not cars, after all. Regardless, their pitch sold him on the idea. He put up the necessary capital to get the proposed operation up and running. For his contribution, the new venture received his name, leading to the Hudson Motor Car Company being founded on this day in 1909.  This and cover: 1909 Hudson Model 20 (red) next to a 1909 Hupmobile (blue). By Brian Corey The company made its first home in the old Aerocar factory on the intersection of Mack Avenue and Beaufait Street in Detroit, Michigan, and quickly went to work with their first car rolling off the production line on July 3...
February 11, 1959 – NASCAR great Marshall Teague killed in speed record attempt
This Day

February 11, 1959 – NASCAR great Marshall Teague killed in speed record attempt

Marshall Teague with Hudson Hornet Marshall Teague walked unannounced into the Detroit offices of Hudson Motor Car Company and left with a sponsor for his NASCAR racing career, securing his place in history after selling himself as the best driver on four wheels. He’d make a great case for that claim during the 1951 and 1952 seasons as a driver of the “Fabulous Hudson Hornet” stock cars. Teague won seven of his 23 NASCAR entries before dropping out of the league in 1953 following disputes with NASCAR founder Bill France Sr.  Always craving a checkered flag, the Teague, AKA, the King of the Beach joined other racing circuits, including Formula One. It was that unhealthy addiction to going fast that pushed him to try and top 177 mph on this day in 1959. His goal? To break the closed c...

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