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Tag: lincoln

October 5, 1964 – Limo JFK was shot in returns to presidential service
This Day

October 5, 1964 – Limo JFK was shot in returns to presidential service

You'd think a federal government would opt for scrapping a car a president was shot in. Most countries would, right? The US of A is not one of them. After President Kennedy was shot on November 22, 1963, the presidential Lincoln Continental went to Hess & Eisenhardt to receive upgrades. There it underwent a number of modifications, including armor plating, bullet-resistant glass and a bulletproof permanent roof. Upon its reconstruction, the JFK Lincoln returned to presidential service on this day in 1964. It would provide rides for presidents and their guests until 1978. The JFK car now resides at the Henry Ford Museum near Detroit. Above: The presidential limo as it sits at the Henry Ford Museum. By Alvintrusty - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0. Top: JFK riding in the car minutes befo...
September 16, 1920 – The first Lincoln automobile
Features, This Day

September 16, 1920 – The first Lincoln automobile

Henry Leland founded Lincoln Motor Company in 1917 to produce Liberty V12 aircraft engine for the US involvement in World War I. Leland, who also founded Cadillac in 1903, was able to fund the company after receiving a $10 million government contract to produce the engines. By the time the war concluded, the company's Detroit plant had been the final assembly location of more than 6,500 airplane motors made of parts sourced from Ford, Cadillac, Packard and other automakers. Since their contract ended with the war, Leland and his son planned a transition into building luxury automobiles. While retooling their facility they officially reorganized as an automaker in January of 1920. Just nine months later, on this day in 1920, the first Lincoln automobile, a 1921 Model L, left the factor...
July 29, 1909 – General Motors buys Cadillac
This Day

July 29, 1909 – General Motors buys Cadillac

When General Motors (GM) purchased Cadillac on this day in 1909 for $4.5 million in GM stock, Cadillac was already the top seller of luxury automobiles in the United States. The history of Cadillac begins with the failure of Henry Ford’s second attempt at starting a car company. When Detroit engineer and machinist Henry Leland was approached by Ford’s former investors to appraise their facility and equipment, he instead convinced the men to continue with their plans to build a car company. His idea was to use his own engine design and the investors' blueprints for what was to originally be the first car from the Henry Ford Company.  Above: 1903 CadillacTop: 1908 Cadillac Model S. By DougW at English Wikipedia Henry Leland You can still make history from behind a mask! Only $...
June 12, 1971 – The last Lincoln Mark III
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June 12, 1971 – The last Lincoln Mark III

When Ford president Lee Iacocca told Design Vice President Gene Bordinat to "put a Rolls Royce grille on a Thunderbird" for Lincoln’s next top luxury model, the Continental Mark III was born. It would be three years before the Cadillac Eldorado competitor would hit the market, but it did so with great success. Introduced in April 1968 as a 1969 model, the Mark III outsold the Eldorado that year, and for multiple years after. The car was developed for only $30 million, and sold high volumes, making it one of the greatest successes of Iacocca’s career at Ford. The last Mark III left the factory on this day in 1971, succeeded by the Mark IV, which continued the same successful sales pattern.
February 16, 1843 – Henry Leland, founder of Cadillac & Lincoln, is born
Automotive, This Day

February 16, 1843 – Henry Leland, founder of Cadillac & Lincoln, is born

Henry Leland, founder of Cadillac and Lincoln, was born on this day in 1843. He began his professional engineering career in the firearms industry, including time spent at Colt. His exceptional eye for toolmaking, manufacturing and parts interchangeability resulted in a partnership with Robert Faulconer. The two later founded Leland & Faulconer Manufacturing Co. in Detroit. Faulconer, left and Leland, right, at their Detroit office. Though he worked on engines as early as 1870, it wasn’t until the automobile industry’s rapid expansion that he found it lucrative, initially as the engine supplied for Ransom E. Olds. Then, in 1902, partners of the already defunct Henry Ford Company approached Leland & Faulconer to conduct an appraisal of the Ford factory and toolings prior to ...