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February 28, 1975 – AMC Introduces the Pacer
Automotive, This Day

February 28, 1975 – AMC Introduces the Pacer

The “first wide small car,” the AMC Pacer, hit showrooms on this day in 1975. Quickly earning the nickname the Flying Fishbowl, the Pacer and its 37% glass surface area was AMC’s sub compact snub to the gas guzzlers that were continuously rolling out of American auto plants. Despite worries from inside AMC about its design, the economical car received various accolades from Car and Driver and Road and Track. Popular Mechanics even wrote, “This is the first time in the history of the American automobile industry that a car manufacturer has said in advance of bringing out a new product that some people may not like it.” Above: D/L Coupe - By Triskel99 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0Top: 1975 AMC Pacer D/L by Greg Gherdingen Richard Teague, American Motor’s chief stylist, began work on th...
December 3, 1979 – The last AMC Pacer
This Day

December 3, 1979 – The last AMC Pacer

The 1970s gas crisis forced automakers to rethink their rather bulbous lineups. By the middle of the decade, consumers interest in style and power waned as focused shifted to value and fuel efficiency. AMC's answer? The Pacer. When it debuted in February 1975, AMC appeared to have an instant hit on its hands. More than 145,000 Pacers sold in their first year of production alone. Like the 70s, sales soon ran out of gas. Between 1976 and the end of 1979, the car averaged sales of about 35,000 units per year. That's good, if you're selling pet rocks. By the time Pacer production ended on this day in 1979, some 280,000 had left the assembly line in total. 1975 AMC Pacer interior and dash. By Christopher Ziemnowicz. Top: The large amount of glass used in the Pacer gave it the name ...
December 3, 1979 – The last AMC Pacer
Business

December 3, 1979 – The last AMC Pacer

Introduced in February 1975, the AMC Pacer was promoted as “the first wide small car” and had a surface area that was 37 percent glass. The last of the iconic 1970s “Flying Fishbowls” rolled out off the Kenosha, Wisconsin assembly line on this day in 1979.  In its first year of production 145,528 were sold but sales soon slowed and only a total of 280,000 cars were built in total for model years 1975 through 1980. At a time when Detroit was still pushing gas guzzling land yachts, the Pacer was a novel idea, but it failed to take off due to several consumer concerns. A lack of power and fuel economy that was less than that of competing Asian and German imports, along with minimal storage space all led to the demise of the Pacer. Pic - 1979 AMC Pacer - Public Domain

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