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Tag: Tucker

I found a Tucker 48 on Google Street View
Features

I found a Tucker 48 on Google Street View

Screenshot (Google) If you're unfamiliar with the Tucker story, start here. If you're aware, you probably know that just fifty complete Tuckers left the Chicago assembly plant, plus the original prototype, before operations seized on March 3, 1949. Incredibly, 49 of those 51 cars have survived to date. Of the two that didn't make it, one is accounted for, burned and buried in someone's yard. The only unaccounted Tucker, #1042, supposedly ended up in poor condition along a Tennessee river, only to have a cop tow it to his house. Soon after, the cop got into a motorcycle wreck and ended up in the hospital for quite some time. During his stay, his landlord apparently towed the car off, perhaps to the crusher, but there is no official record. So to this day, #1042 is the only missing Tucke...
September 21, 1903 – Preston Tucker is born
Features, This Day

September 21, 1903 – Preston Tucker is born

On this day in 1903 American car designer, engineer and inventor Preston Tucker was born in Capac, Michigan. While best known for the Tucker 48, his legacy in the auto industry has a far greater reach. Tucker got his start in the car business as an office boy for Cadillac before joining the local police force at age 19. As a copper he had his first opportunity to drive high powered police cars and motorcycles, sprouting an interest in automobile development. His mother had him removed from the force after pointing out he was below the agency’s age limit to be an officer. He then took a job managing a gas station and working on the Ford assembly line. His gas station would later become a small Studebaker dealership before again joining the police force. During his last spell as an offi...
January 22, 1950 – Preston Tucker is not guilty
This Day

January 22, 1950 – Preston Tucker is not guilty

Decades of work in the auto industry taught Preston Tucker that change was constant and necessary. His experiences provided the world view he needed to create an astonishing new car for the post WWII world. What he developed in the late 1940s was the Tucker 48, a futuristic vehicle that featured such innovations as a padded steering wheel, safety glass, a roll bar and center cyclops headlight, all powered by 334 cubic inch (5.47l) aircraft engine. For Tucker, the future had arrived. There was much public interest in his vehicle, but even after securing $17 million in funding and purchasing a factory, he was still short on cash for further development and production. To raise money, Tucker sold dealerships and automotive accessories, including seat covers and luggage, before pro...

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