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November 11, 1978 – The Dukes of Hazzard films iconic jump
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November 11, 1978 – The Dukes of Hazzard films iconic jump

On the campus of Oxford College in Alabama, “The Dukes of Hazzard” crew filmed the iconic General Lee jump that takes place in the opening credits of the show on this day in 1978. The 16 foot high, 82 feet long jump over Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane’s cruiser totaled the orange 1969 Dodge Charger. Of course, they had plenty more Chargers in the studio lot. The stunt coordinator for the show bought as many of the cars as he could find. At the time there was no shortages, as Chrysler sold about 85,000 Chargers in 1969. The cars received roll bars, heavy duty suspension, altered brakes and other custom touches to make them safe and show ready. The cars that went airborne often received trunks full of concrete to prevent them from flipping. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKs1iF-g...
August 4, 1928 – DeSoto is founded
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August 4, 1928 – DeSoto is founded

1929 DeSoto On this day in 1928, Walter Chrysler founded DeSoto, which provided Chrysler Corporation a vehicle line aimed at the mid priced auto market. The plan was to pit the brand against Oldsmobile, Willys, Studebaker and other similarly valued automobiles. However, Chrysler acquired Dodge Brothers soon after DeSoto made its 1929 model year debut, giving Chrysler two mid priced brands. Additionally, Chrysler had just announced Plymouth about a month prior, which was to be Chrysler’s entry level vehicle. Chrysler was soon trying different juggling acts to make their entire line up profitable. DeSoto had a strong first year, selling 81,065 cars in 1929. This broke a record for the most vehicles sold for a new model of car in 365 days. Chrysler priced Dodge slightly above DeSoto at...
April 30, 1925 – Dodge Brothers is sold for record amount
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April 30, 1925 – Dodge Brothers is sold for record amount

An interesting transaction took place on this day in 1925 when Dillon, Read & Company, a formerly prominent American investment bank, purchased Dodge Brothers, Inc. It wasn’t so much the actual sale that stirred interest, but the terms of the deal. The car company sold for $146 million, plus an additional $50 million to be dispersed to various charities. At $146 million alone, the sale became the largest deal to date for any automaker. When adjusted for inflation, this totals more than $2.7 billion in 2020 dollars. Above: 1925 Dodge, from the year of the saleTop: Horace and John Dodge in the first production Dodge in 1914. Dillon, Read & Company was an investment powerhouse in the 1920s. They had a reputation for daring transactions outside the purchase of Dodge, which t...
January 5, 1924 – The first Chrysler car debuts
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January 5, 1924 – The first Chrysler car debuts

Visitors to the lobby of the Commodore Hotel in New York City on this day in automotive history in 1924 may have been treated to the public unveiling of the first Chrysler car to use the trademarked name. Released under Maxwell as the Chrysler Six during the New York Motor Show, the car had only began rolling off the assembly line on December 20, a few weeks prior. Getting to this point was no easy task for proprietor Walter Chrysler. Maxwell-Chalmers hired Chrysler to head the ailing automobile brand just a year before. They had high hopes that Chrysler could save the company, as he had recent success revitalizing Willys-Overland. Among the first steps Chrysler took to get MC out of the hole: shutting down production of Chalmers in 1923. This left Maxwell on its own. To give the c...
Coming or Going? Dual Nose 1941 Dodge For Sale
Cheap Classic Cars

Coming or Going? Dual Nose 1941 Dodge For Sale

Some cars look stunning coming straight at you, while others glisten when their tail lights glow. In the case of the looks of this 1941 Dodge, it really doesn't matter which way it is going! This unique build features dual noses, steering wheels, dashboards and everything else needed to mirror its image front to rear, or is that front to front? It even has two working radios! Any way you look at it, you're sure to get a few confused gazes as you cruise down the street. It appears that confusion started long ago, assuming the newspaper clipping included in the ad (pictured below) is about the same car. More on that in a minute. If you're interested in angering fellow commuters or having a grand ole time in the parade, you can buy this 1941 Dodge "Luxury Liner Dual Nose" in Los Angeles ...
December 5, 1977 – Chrysler Corp debuts FWD compacts Omni & Horizon
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December 5, 1977 – Chrysler Corp debuts FWD compacts Omni & Horizon

The first mass produced front wheel drive cars from the Chrysler Corporation debuted on this day in 1977. The subcompact Dodge Omni and Plymouth Horizon would help save the company. They became a popular alternative to economical imports at a time when Chrysler was losing major money. Aside from being the first FWD cars from Chrysler, they're among the first from any American automaker. Previous domestic FWD cars include the Cord 810/812, introduced for 1936, followed by the Oldsmobile Toronado, first offered in 1966, and the 1967 Cadillac Eldorado. The cars remained in production for eleven years with few changes. Some 2,500,000 Omnis and Horizons left the factory by the end of their run in 1990.
November 14, 1914 – The first Dodge car leaves the factory
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November 14, 1914 – The first Dodge car leaves the factory

Horace Dodge (left rear) and John Dodge (right rear) in “Old Betsy” in front of John Dodge’s Boston Boulevard home on November 14, 1914. Guy Ameel, superintendent of final assembly for Dodge Brothers is driving. This is likely a pre-production vehicle. After finding massive success as a partsmaker in Detroit's blossoming auto industry in the early 1900s, the Dodge Brothers, John and Horace, signed a deal to build parts exclusively for Ford. Since Henry Ford didn't have the capital to pay them directly for their services, he awarded them $10,000 in Ford Motor Company stock. As the brothers produced engines and other parts for the new Ford Model T starting in 1908, Ford's success amplified their own wealth beyond their wildest dreams. However, the two were not content building other peop...
November 2, 1983 – The first minivans from Chrysler leave the assembly line
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November 2, 1983 – The first minivans from Chrysler leave the assembly line

Lee Iacocca with the first Plymouth Voyager A few years before automotive executives Lee Iacocca and his Mustang sidekick Hal Sperlich found themselves kicked to the curb outside of Ford headquarters, the two spearheaded a new concept car known as the Carousel. Henry Ford II, who often butt heads with Iacocca, was less than impressed. It's design was radical, unlike anything else on the road. The Edsel fiasco also weighed heavy on Hank's shoulders, reducing his will to take a chance on a new vehicle. In the late 1970s, Iacocca and Sperlich both ended up fired from Ford and then hired by the struggling Chrysler Corporation. With Iacocca as president (later chairman and CEO), the two brought their concept back to life. Renamed the Magic Wagon during development, the project would res...
Cheap(ish) Mopar – One Owner 1971 Dodge Charger – $8,800
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Cheap(ish) Mopar – One Owner 1971 Dodge Charger – $8,800

It may not be a Hemi, but it's got a V8! This 1971 Dodge Charger for sale just popped up on Craigslist near Tacoma, Washington, with the seller claiming it to be a single family car since new. This basic muscle car is a little rough around the edges and it's showing a little gray (literally, see below for the primer shots), but it'll clean up well. With cars like this going for near $30,000 in slightly better condition, I believe this here's a pretty dang good deal. Let's take a closer peek. This green Dodge Charger 500 is equipped with the 318 V8 and an automatic, possibly the same ones it left the factory with, but it doesn't say for sure. Correct me if I am wrong, but with base muscle, I believe matching numbers are less critical to value. In any case, it may not be the most excitin...
September 14, 1969 – Dodge Charger Daytona makes NASCAR debut, wins at Talladega
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September 14, 1969 – Dodge Charger Daytona makes NASCAR debut, wins at Talladega

On this day in 1969 the green flag flew at the inaugural Talladega 500, despite many of NASCAR’s biggest names skipping the race. Richard Petty, David Pearson, Cale Yarborough, Wendell Scott, Buddy Baker and other members of the Professional Driver Association boycotted the event, due to concerns about tire safety. During Grand National practice at the new track, which held its first auto race just the day before, multiple drivers experienced blowouts. Many believed the cause of the trouble was the track being too fast, resulting in increased tire wear. To ensure the show went on, NASCAR founder Bill France enticed enough drivers from the previous day’s Grand Touring event to race the 500 too. Amid the controversy, a brand new car hit the track for the first time, the 1969 Dodge Charg...

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