Tag: chevrolet

For Sale: 1970 Chevy El Camino – $10K
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For Sale: 1970 Chevy El Camino – $10K

Chevrolet introduced the El Camino for the 1959 model year to compete with the Ford Ranchero. Ford's car/truck utility vehicle came to market two years prior and Chevy recognized its potential. Like the Ranchero, Chevy built it on an existing platform, the Biscayne B body two-door wagon platform. However, following the 1960 model year, Chevrolet pulled the El Camino from its lineup. Obviously that wasn't the end of the line for the vehicle. It returned in 1964, now based on the Chevelle. Fast forward six years and we get this 1970 Chevrolet El Camino for sale near Helena, Montana. While its Chevelle brethren commands a hefty price tag, this Elco is listed for just $10,000. Better yet, it's ready to go. Daily Driver El Camino? The seller doesn't offer a whole lot of informati...
September 12, 1966 – The press meets the Chevrolet Camaro
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September 12, 1966 – The press meets the Chevrolet Camaro

On this day in 1966 members of the press were invited to a special General Motors event to meet the car that would go head to head with the Ford Mustang, the Chevrolet Camaro. The car had already been rolling off assembly lines since August 11, but this was the first time anyone outside GM got an up close look at the “Small vicious animal that eats Mustangs,” as described by Chevrolet general manager Pete Estes. The car would officially go on sale as a 1967 model about two weeks later, on September 29. Above: 1967 Chevrolet Camaro. By GTHO - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0. Top. First generation Chevrolet Camaro ad. Available as a 2+2 coupe or convertible, buyers had many options to choose from when selecting their new car. Under the hood alone there were seven options for 1967, ranging ...
September 10, 1970 – Chevrolet Vega goes on sale
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September 10, 1970 – Chevrolet Vega goes on sale

On this day in 1970, dealerships began selling the 1971 Chevrolet Vega. The subcompact commuter, which won Motor Trend's Car of the Year award for 1971, was developed under chief engineer Ed Cole and chief stylist Bill Mitchell. In the years following its introduction, various issues with engineering, safety and reliability were discovered. The media blamed Chevrolet's rush to get the car to market for the numerous issues, as development took less than two years. Many believe insufficient testing occurred during that period to warrant sending the vehicle to market. This ultimately left it up to customers to discover its flaws. Above: The Vega was designed to be shipped vertically in a train car. Top: 1971 Chevrolet Vega The Chevrolet Vega came as a coupe, notchback, wagon and pa...
August 11, 1966 – The first production Chevrolet Camaro is born
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August 11, 1966 – The first production Chevrolet Camaro is born

When Chevrolet general manager Pete Estes held a live press conference at Detroit’s Statler-Hilton Hotel in June of 1966, he opened by informing everyone in attendance that they were charter members of the Society for the Elimination of Panthers from the Automotive World. He then promptly assured them this was the first and last meeting of SEPAW. With that speculation that Chevrolet’s new pony car would be named Panther was immediately put to rest. Estes then shared some basic info on a new car from Chevy that would compete with the Ford Mustang. Internally designated XP-836, Chevrolet had chosen the name he was about to reveal to keep with the letter C theme of their other vehicles, such as the Corvair, Chevelle, Chevy II, and Corvette. Then he echoed the new car’s name: Camaro. Ask...
August 2, 1967 – 1970 Chevelle Clay Model documented
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August 2, 1967 – 1970 Chevelle Clay Model documented

With the 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle being one of the most well-known and sought after muscle cars, it's funny to think what could have been. These shots from Super Chevy magazine, the first dated August 2, 1967, apparently offer a glimpse into the alternate designs the mid-sized muscle car could have carried for the 1970 model year. Is it just me, or does that first shot look more like a Monte Carlo or another heavy Chevy? In any case, we ended up with the iconic Chevelle we know today. What details catch your eye?
July 2, 1992 – The one millionth Corvette
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July 2, 1992 – The one millionth Corvette

On this day in 1992 the 1,000,000th Corvette rolled out of GM's Bowling Green, Kentucky, assembly plant. It was a convertible with a red interior, a white exterior and a black top, the same color schemes as all of the original 1953 Corvettes, which celebrated their 39th birthday just two days prior.  Sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum The 1,000,000th Corvette was severely damaged on February 12, 2014, when a sinkhole opened up inside the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green. Several other important Corvettes were also damaged, some much worse. A painstaking restoration took place to save the 1,000,000th Corvette and it was returned to factory condition and still contains all the signatures from the workers who helped assemble it. The Corvette was America’s first all-...
June 30, 1953 – The first production Corvettes leave the factory
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June 30, 1953 – The first production Corvettes leave the factory

The automotive industry changed forever when the first production Chevrolet Corvette rolled out of a General Motors’ assembly facility in Flint, Michigan, on this day in 1953. The Corvette, which was conceived as a dream vehicle by auto designer Harley Earl, was first introduced to the public as a prototype fiberglass bodied sports car in January of 1953 at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City during GM's annual Motorama. The response from the crowd was enough to warrant putting the vehicle into production, in highly limited numbers. https://youtu.be/Oxyy8_K03w0 Above: Video of 1953 Corvette productionTop: The first Chevrolet Corvettes leave the factory (GM) There were only 300 1953 Corvettes manufactured and each was a white convertible with red interior and a black canv...
May 11, 1978 – 2 millionth Camaro is built
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May 11, 1978 – 2 millionth Camaro is built

Depending on who you ask, Camaro could be a French word for friendship, or an animal that eats Mustangs. The most likely meaning behind the name? A typo, or possibly French slang. Keeping in line with other C-names of the era, such as Chevelle, Corvette and Corvair, Chevrolet suits were on the hunt for the perfect name for their Mustang compeitor. The story goes that Chevrolet merchandising manager Bob Lund and General Motors vice president Ed Rollett discovered the word Camaro in Heath's French and English Dictionary by James Boïelle and by de V. Payen-Payne, which was printed in 1936. The French-English dictionary supposedly listed the word as a slang term that meant friend, pal, or comrade. In contemporary French, the term doesn't exist. In any regard, the name was chosen and the Camar...
April 16, 1946 – Arthur Chevrolet commits suicide
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April 16, 1946 – Arthur Chevrolet commits suicide

Arthur Chevrolet passed away on this day in 1946 after hanging himself. For many years prior he battled unyielding depression. Arthur and his brothers Louis and Gaston were highly successful race car drivers between the 1900s and 1920s. It is Louis, though, who worked with Billy Durant to co-found Chevrolet car company. After Louis left Chevrolet shortly after production began, the three brothers became partners in the Frontenac Motor Corporation. A Frontenac automobile After injuries all but ended Arthur’s racing career in 1920, the same year Gaston died in a racing accident, Arthur began to focus more on automotive development and engineering. One of his biggest accomplishments was receiving a patent in 1930 for an “Overhead Valve Engine.” He and his brother would later found Chev...
April 8, 1916 – Auto racing pioneer Bob Burman dies
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April 8, 1916 – Auto racing pioneer Bob Burman dies

Bob Burman participated in many significant races in the early 20th century, including winning the Prest-O-Lite Trophy Race in 1909 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the precursor to the Indy 500. Unfortunately, it was racing that would kill him. Burman died racing on this day in 1916 at age 31 when he crashed his open-cockpit Peugeot in Corona, California. The wreck also took the life of his riding mechanic, Erick Schrader, an on-duty policeman, and the lives of three spectators. Another five fans suffered serious injuries. Above: Bob BurmanTop: Louis Chevrolet & Bob Burman in the Buick Bugs of 1910 Burman’s career was quite successful, including spending several years with the Buick team starting in circa 1908. This team, which included Louis Chevrolet, went on to win half of al...