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September 20, 1979 – Lee Iacocca elected chairman of Chrysler
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September 20, 1979 – Lee Iacocca elected chairman of Chrysler

Industry giant Lido “Lee” Anthony Iacocca was elected chairman of Chrysler on this day in 1979, 10 months after joining the company as president. It was Lee’s career at Ford Motor Company that would lead him to the top of Chrysler. As a vice president at Ford more than a decade prior Iacocca was instrumental in the introduction of the Ford Mustang. From there he forecast the need for fuel efficient, domestically made cars, which led to the development of the Pinto. He became president of Ford in 1970 but Henry Ford II fired him unceremoniously in 1978. He attributed the event to fundamentally different business ideologies than those of Ford II (even though Ford saw a profit of more than $2 billion in Iacocca’s final year). Above: Iacocca leaning on Mustang (NY Times). Top: Iacocca with...
Take Home This Wishful Woody – 1950 Ford Country Squire Needs Help
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Take Home This Wishful Woody – 1950 Ford Country Squire Needs Help

In the early years of Ford Motor Company, Henry Ford believed his car company should be self sustainable. He desired to build cars completely from the ground up. This meant mining ore, operating rubber plantations and growing trees for their wood to build Model T floorboards and other wood body parts. For the latter, Ford purchased some 500 wooded acres in Michigan, which provided a constant supply of lumber. That expansive forest would eventually become the source for complete bodies, birth the Ford woody wagons. Fast forward to 1950 and this Ford Woody Wagon, presumably a Ford Country Squire, rolled off the line. It's one of less than 23,000 built that year, still using real wood from Ford's forest. This example, badly in need of restoration, is found on Craigslist near Spokane, WA ...
September 16, 1908 – The birth of General Motors
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September 16, 1908 – The birth of General Motors

Buick Motor Car company owner William C. Durant leveraged an engine supply deal with McLaughlin Motor Car Company of Canada to found General Motors on this day in 1908. In the beginning, the Detroit headquartered GM , which positioned it self as an automotive holding company, had only Buick, under its umbrella. Within a decade it would acquire more than twenty companies. Above: A woman driving a 1910 Buick. Top: William Durant with Chevrolet 490 Durant would acquire Oldsmobile later in 1908, bringing GM’s holdings to two. The next year, GM purchased Cadillac, Cartercar, Elmore, Ewing, Oakland, Reliance Motor Truck Company and Rapid Motor Vehicle Company. The latter two being the predecessors to GMC. That same year, Durant initiated an attempt to purchase Ford Motor Company for...
September 9, 1982 – Henry Ford II (sort of) leaves Ford Motor Company
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September 9, 1982 – Henry Ford II (sort of) leaves Ford Motor Company

Henry Ford II (Ford) On this day in 1982 Henry Ford II announced he would remove himself from any involvement at the Ford Motor Company. Ford II, grandson of Henry Ford, became president of FMC following the death of his father Edsel in 1943 and the realization that Henry Ford I was no longer capable of running Ford due to his ailing health.  At the time Edsel passed away, Ford Motor Company was losing millions of dollars per month, in large part due to its destroyed European factories. When Ford II took the reins he acquired the mighty task of saving the family business.  Through reorganization of Ford’s manufacturing processes and restructuring its staff, Ford II got things back on track. A huge component of the success starting in the late 1940s was his hiring of the Whiz Kids. M...
September 7, 1954 – Ford Thunderbird production begins
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September 7, 1954 – Ford Thunderbird production begins

Ford's answer to the Corvette, the Thunderbird, began rolling down the assembly line on this day in 1954 for the 1955 model year. The first complete car would leave the factory two days later. While designed to compete with Chevrolet's sports car, Ford marketed the Thunderbird as a personal luxury vehicle. The Blue Oval emphasized its new car's comfort and convenience, letting shoppers discover its sportiness during the test drive. The plan worked. T-Bird sales rose above Corvette some 17 to 1 in 1955. Though successful, executives believed expanding the two-seat T-Bird would also expand sales. They weren't wrong. Above: 1965 Ford Thunderbird By F.G.Bendiks. Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0. Top: First generation Ford Thunderbird by nakhon100 CC BY 2.0 Though the two-seater found continue...
September 5, 1930 – A backwards trip comes to an end
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September 5, 1930 – A backwards trip comes to an end

The names Charles Creighton and James Hargis probably doesn’t ring any bells, but they may put a kink in your neck. These two completed a New York to Los Angeles -- and back journey -- in a Ford Model A on this day in 1930. Oh, and they did it all in reverse gear. The nearly 7,200 mile journey across unpaved roads took 42 days, but if doing it backwards wasn't strange enough they never once turned off the Ford. This includes during a 48 hour rest in Los Angeles! Who is ready for a road trip?
August 10, 1978 – 3 teenage girls die in fiery Ford Pinto crash
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August 10, 1978 – 3 teenage girls die in fiery Ford Pinto crash

The Ford Pinto hit the market in response to highly economical imports from Japan and Europe. The subcompact sat on an all new platform, but featured a drivetrain for the Euro-spec Ford Escort. While the car sold well, it hardly drew attention from reporters when released for 1971. In the years that followed, a controversy would erupt. The issue with the car stemmed from the placement of the gas tank in the Pinto, which sat outside the frame. By 1974, rumors of fiery accidents related to the tank began to swirl inside and outside of Ford. Things really blew up in Ford's face when on of the most devastating accidents related to the Pinto occurred on this day in 1978. Sisters Lyn (16) and Judy Ulrich (18), and their cousin Donna Ulrich (18), were on the side of U.S. 33 in Indiana...
Gas Monkey Galaxie – Running 1967 Ford Galaxie 500 (really cheap!)
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Gas Monkey Galaxie – Running 1967 Ford Galaxie 500 (really cheap!)

Ole Richard Rawlings is passing on a stalled restoration project that could be a great score for someone looking for a little muscle to add to their collection. Offered directly by Gas Monkey Garage on Craigslist in Dallas for just $3,950, this running and driving 1967 Ford Galaxie appears to be a screaming deal. At least on the surface. Sure, it ain't perfect, but pop the hood and you'll find a 289 V8 that's connected to a four speed manual transmission. Uh, hello! Time to burn some rubber! Right? Not quite. This car will need a thorough inspection and a solid once over before anyone tries tearing up the streets. Of course, that could just be liability speaking. Let's take a closer look. Ford Galaxie Exterior At first glance, this blue and white Blue Oval looks pretty tired...
Rusty & Fast – 1951 Ford Hot Rod (Cheap!)
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Rusty & Fast – 1951 Ford Hot Rod (Cheap!)

They say all the good deals are gone. Who are they, anyway? Who cares, because you just came across a wicked ratty runner just begging for burnouts, and it's very fairly priced. This 1951 Ford for sale is rusty, dirty and friggin' awesome. It's nice to find an old hot rod project car on Craigslist that isn't absurd in the dollars column. You can bring home this one for just $6,000 if you make the trek to Wichita Falls, Texas. At the time of writing, the ad is only six hours old. Grab your bank roll and hit the road already! Yee-Haw. This 1951 Ford Victoria is a two door coupe that someone built into a real head turner and then parked out in the field for awhile. At some point in time a 351 Windsor V8 got stuffed under the hood. The seller states it runs great and will smoke the tir...
July 3, 1945 – The first postwar cars
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July 3, 1945 – The first postwar cars

Ford got a jump on postwar production by, well, not waiting until the war was actually over. On this day in 1945, Ford began production of 1946 model year cars, more than a month before World War II would actually come to an end on the Pacific Front. Ford was the first major American automaker to begin manufacturing personal vehicles since the outbreak of war led to all automakers transitioning into the production of military goods. Above: a 1946 FordTop: Harry Truman's 1946 Ford Super DeLuxe Tudor sedan was the 1st car to roll off the famous Ford assembly line when production resumed after World War II. It was Henry Ford II that pushed for production to begin as early as it did. It’s curious to note that the first new Ford, a white 1946 Super DeLuxe Tudor sedan, went to Preside...

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